List of factors that can be predictive of fatalities and life-altering injuries; factors that need to be addressed in effective, sustainable fatality/life-altering injuries processes:

1 Lost-workday case rate *University of Utah Study – Summary of Potential Predictors of Fatalities and Serious Injuries (Phillips and Waitzman, 2008)

2 Competency of safety management executives *John Mogford, Senior Group Vice President, Safety & Operations, presentation to the Center for Chemical Process Safety, 2nd Global Congress on Process Safety (2006)

3 Presence and competency of site safety supervision *University of Utah Study – Summary of Potential Predictors of Fatalities and Serious Injuries (Phillips and Waitzman, 2008) *Jaselskis et al, Strateties for Achieving Excellence in Construction Safety Performance, Journal of Construction Engineering and Management (1996)

4 Effectiveness of behavior-based safety process *University of Utah Study – Summary of Potential Predictors of Fatalities and Serious Injuries (Phillips and Waitzman, 2008) *Jeff Shockey, Corporate Safety Director, Alcoa, Fatality Prevention in the Workplace Forum, (November 2007), EHS Today (Jan, 2008 issue)

5 Financial health (depth of safety resources) of enterprise *University of Utah Study – Summary of Potential Predictors of Fatalities and Serious Injuries (Phillips and Waitzman, 2008) *EPA and Wharton School, Accident Epidemiology and the RMP Rule: Learning from a Decade of Accident History Data for the U.S. Chemical Industry (2007) *Jaselskis et al, Strateties for Achieving Excellence in Construction Safety Performance, Journal of Construction Engineering and Management (1996)

6 Contractor pre-qualification screening *University of Utah Study – Summary of Potential Predictors of Fatalities and Serious Injuries (Phillips and Waitzman, 2008) *Tom Rancour, Rancour & Associates, LLC Predictors of Contractor Fatalities and Serious Injuries (2008)

7 Process safety management competency *OSHA Process Safety Management Standard 29 CFR 1910.119 – 14 key PSM requirements *European Contractor Health and Safety Assessment Scheme (CHAS) *Isadore Rosenthal, predicting and Confriming the Effectiveness of Systems for Managing Low-Probability Chemical Process Risks, Process Safety Progress (2006)

8 Effectiveness of focus on transportation safety, fall prevention, workplace violence prevention, electrical work and construction safety *Bureau of Labor Statistics Studies, Review of fatal occupational injuries by event or exposure from 2001-2006

9 Effectiveness of focus on non-routine work, non-production work, high-energy work *Dan Petersen, Safety Management 2nd Edition (19989) *Fred Manuele, The challenge of Preventing Serious Injuries: A Proposal for SH&E Professionals, Professional Safety (April, 2006)

10 Effectiveness of employee orientation, training, buddy systems *Liska and Goodloe, Zero Accident Techniques: A Report fo the Construction Industry Institute 91993)

11 Effectiveness of substance abuse and alcohol programs *Findley et al, Safety program Elements in Construction: which ones best prevent injuries and control workers’ compensation costs? Professional Safety (February 2004) — survey of 305 member companies of the Tennessee chapter of the Associated General Contractors *Liska and Goodloe, Zero Accident Techniques: A Report fo the Construction Industry Institute 91993)

12 Effectiveness of pre-job safety briefings *Findley et al, Safety program Elements in Construction: which ones best prevent injuries and control workers’ compensation costs? Professional Safety (February 2004) — survey of 305 member companies of the Tennessee chapter of the Associated General Contractors *Liska and Goodloe, Zero Accident Techniques: A Report fo the Construction Industry Institute 91993)

13 Effectiveness of incident investigations coupled with essential hazard abatement *Liska and Goodloe, Zero Accident Techniques: A Report fo the Construction Industry Institute 91993)

14 Amount of spending on safety and health on site *EPA and Wharton School, Accident Epidemiology and the RMP Rule: Learning from a Decade of Accident History Data for the U.S. Chemical Industry (2007)

15 Number of inspections/audits *Jaselskis et al, Strateties for Achieving Excellence in Construction Safety Performance, Journal of Construction Engineering and Management (1996) Quality of inspections/audits *John Mogford, Senior Group Vice President, Safety & Operations, presentation to the Center for Chemical Process Safety, 2nd Global Congress on Process Safety (2006)

16 Effectiveness of employee engagement activities *Jaselskis et al, Strateties for Achieving Excellence in Construction Safety Performance, Journal of Construction Engineering and Management (1996) *John Mogford, Senior Group Vice President, Safety & Operations, presentation to the Center for Chemical Process Safety, 2nd Global Congress on Process Safety (2006)

17 Effectiveness of pre-project and pre-task planning *Findley et al, Safety program Elements in Construction: which ones best prevent injuries and control workers’ compensation costs? Professional Safety (February 2004) — survey of 305 member companies of the Tennessee chapter of the Associated General Contractors

18 Effectiveness of defined safety roles and responsibilities *Findley et al, Safety program Elements in Construction: which ones best prevent injuries and control workers’ compensation costs? Professional Safety (February 2004) — survey of 305 member companies of the Tennessee chapter of the Associated General Contractors *John Mogford, Senior Group Vice President, Safety & Operations, presentation to the Center for Chemical Process Safety, 2nd Global Congress on Process Safety (2006)

19 Upper management commitment and support *Partha Das Sharma, Quality Leadership is the most important in elimination of fatalities in the workplace *Jaselskis et al, Strateties for Achieving Excellence in Construction Safety Performance, Journal of Construction Engineering and Management (1996) *Liska and Goodloe, Zero Accident Techniques: A Report fo the Construction Industry Institute 91993)

20 Monitoring and communication feedback loops to detect systematic migration of organization behavior toward increased risk-taking and latent risk conditions *John Mogford, Senior Group Vice President, Safety & Operations, presentation to the Center for Chemical Process Safety, 2nd Global Congress on Process Safety (2006)

21 Significance of Organizational Culture *Dan Petersen, Safety Management 2nd Edition (19989) *Fred Manuele, The challenge of Preventing Serious Injuries: A Proposal for SH&E Professionals, Professional Safety (April, 2006) *CJ Pitzer, When Organizations Fail: New Thinking on Catastrophes, Aus!MM (2006) *Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) Synopsis, Jennifer Troxell, NASA History Office (2003) *The Report of the BP U.S. Refineries Independent Safety Review Panel (January 2007) *The Impact of the BP Baker Report and Process Safety Survey — a survey to 379 subscribers of the Mary Kay O’Connor Process Safety Center (February, 2009), Dr. Stephanie C. Payne, Jennifer Rodrigues, Mindy Bergman, Texas A&M Univerity *James Reason, Managing the Risks of Organizational Accidents, Ashgate Publishing (paperback, 1997) *James Reason, Checklist for Assessing Institutional Resilience, presented at the 2000 Manly Conference; reproduced for Transport Canada at www.tc.gc.ca *NIOSH Report: Safety Program Practices in Record-Holding Plants, March 1979, Publication No. 79-136 — 1) a more humanistic approach in dealing with employees; 2) a strong sense of community, belonging, and loyalty among the employees